Tuesday, December 01, 2020

UIS College of Business and Management receives a $100,000 gift to help initiatives exploring the future of business education

A business class meets on Feb. 26, 2020, in University Hall

A $100,000 gift to the University of Illinois Springfield College of Business and Management will support the creation of several initiatives and market-relevant programs that will provide students with dynamic educational opportunities. 

The gift from Christine and Lou Friedrich will help jump-start several initiatives in finance, economics and beyond that explore the future of business education. Lou Friedrich is a life director of the University of Illinois Foundation Board of Directors, and an alumnus of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in general engineering. 

“We are thrilled to be able to support the innovative initiatives of the UIS College of Business and Management,” Lou Friedrich said. 

The gift comes at a time that the College is starting projects on business and society through the creation of associated think-tanks and multiple speakers’ series, a student managed investment fund, and the incorporation of data analytics and data analytic platforms throughout the College’s core and majors. Once implemented the projects will better equip students to dive right into the business world upon graduation. 

“Scholars across disciplines in business and the humanities are increasingly recognizing that business and the economy cannot be studied in isolation from the rest of the human experience,” said Som Bhattacharya, dean of the UIS College of Business and Management. “Business and society need to be studied together so we can truly understand the process of human welfare, social progress, and the ability to achieve a more equitable society.” 

Lou Friedrich worked for Bernstein Global Wealth Management, New York, for 31 years as a principal and managing director. He also worked as vice president of finance for Sanford C. Bernstein & Co, and as deputy budget director/acting budget director for the City of New York from 1978-82. 

The UIS College of Business and Management is AACSB accredited and offers nine undergraduate and three graduate degrees, in addition to seven graduate certificates. Learn more about the College at uis.edu/cbm

Wednesday, November 11, 2020

UIS to resume in-person instruction, while reducing non-essential activities starting Nov. 12

The following message was sent to UIS students, faculty and staff on Nov. 11, 2020.

Dear UIS Students, Faculty and Staff:

Thanks again to everyone for their flexibility as we adapt to the constantly evolving nature of the COVID-19 pandemic. While we will present our UIS health stats at our regular briefing this Thursday, as you know, we experienced the highest number of one-day positive cases from our saliva testing on Monday. We received these results Tuesday morning, and we quickly issued a two-day pause in our on-ground operations.

Testing conducted on Tuesday showed we had three positive cases from our saliva testing program and one positive from an off-campus testing site. After evaluating what was learned through contact tracing and yesterday’s lower positivity rate, the COVID-19 Rapid Response Team has recommended—and I agreed—that we will resume in-person instruction tomorrow, Nov. 12, while also reducing non-instructional activities to only essential activities. We have no indication of virus transmission within classroom and workspace environments, but it is clear that transmission is occurring off campus and through social gatherings and visiting bars/restaurants. Thank you to our students, faculty and staff for strictly adhering to our campus guidelines in these settings.

A full list of our approach to campus activities for the next two weeks is below. It is important to note that our entire region has entered a dangerous period for COVID-19 cases, and hospitalizations are rising throughout the state. We must be good community partners to help slow the spread of COVID-19 and prevent our medical systems from becoming further strained, and remember that our behaviors both on and off campus contribute to the bigger picture. I strongly encourage you to stay home as much as possible, leaving only for in-person courses, work, COVID-19 testing, getting food, individual study or recreation, or essential errands (groceries, pharmacy, etc.).

Effective tomorrow, Nov. 12, UIS will take the following approach to campus activities: 

Instruction
  • In-person instruction may resume.
On-site work
  • On-site work may resume and continue as necessary, but remote work is encouraged for employees who can perform their duties remotely.
Indoor study spaces
  • The Student Union will be open until 6 p.m. daily for individuals who want to use the facility to study. No in-person group studying (two or more people) will be allowed; masks must be worn (no dining inside allowed), and individuals must study at least six feet apart.
  • Brookens Library will reopen at noon tomorrow for individual study hours and Grab-n-Go; a full schedule will be posted on the library’s website.
  • For group studying (two or more people), students should pursue virtual formats such as Zoom. 
Food Service
  • Food Service will remain grab-n-go only until 6 p.m. daily; no indoor dining will be allowed in the Student Union.
Recreation
  • Individual outdoor recreation is encouraged and preferred.
  • TRAC will reduce capacity to 25 percent for individual workouts; no in-person programming will occur.
Gatherings
  • All non-instructional gatherings scheduled between now and Thanksgiving should be canceled or converted to a virtual format. This includes events previously approved by the CRRT through the Gathering Request Form.
  • Small-group outdoor campus tours conducted through the Office of Admission may continue. 
Our priority is to safely finish this semester as we intended, with in-person courses through Nov. 25. If our university sees additional spikes in daily positivity rates, the CRRT will quickly conduct contact tracing and weigh the need for an additional pause against the situational factors at hand. Please continue to strictly adhere to our health and safety guidelines; they DO work. 

I will host a campus Zoom briefing with members of the CRRT at 4 p.m. today to address questions. Thank you again for your patience, flexibility and resilience. We will continue to tackle this challenging time, together. 

United in Safety, 

Karen Karen M. Whitney, PhD 
Interim Chancellor University of Illinois Springfield 

Please send questions to covid19@uis.edu.

Tuesday, November 10, 2020

UIS announces two-day “pause” in on-campus classes and activities due to COVID-19

The following message was sent to UIS students, faculty and staff on Nov. 10, 2020.

Dear UIS Students, Faculty and Staff:

I share with you the unfortunate news that we had 15 individuals test positive for COVID-19 yesterday, resulting in a 3.15% daily positivity rate. Out of an abundance of caution, the COVID-19 Rapid Response Team is issuing a two-day pause in campus activity to allow the UIS Testing Team to conduct contact tracing, notify and quarantine affected individuals, and assess the full situation.

Effectively immediately through at least Wednesday, Nov. 11, the following mitigations are in effect:

  • In-person classes currently in session should adjourn as soon as reasonably practical. All classes (daytime and evening) must pivot to remote-only delivery for the remainder of the day and tomorrow (Nov. 11).
  • All in-person gatherings, meetings and athletic practices/training must be postponed or canceled.
  • Food Service will transition to grab-n-go only and close at 6 p.m. today and tomorrow. The Student Union will be open only for individuals to purchase meals in the Food Studio.
  • TRAC will be closed.
  • Brookens Library will be closed.
  • Non-essential personnel should talk to their supervisors about working from home, if possible. Employees (including student workers) should first consult with their supervisor to determine if they need to work on site. 
  • Tomorrow’s emergency notification test is postponed.
  • Masks should be worn in all indoor spaces unless you are alone; this includes residential spaces.

The CRRT is investigating the potential sources of yesterday’s test results and will make its recommendations for the full length of this “pause” as more information is known. Additional information will be shared as it is known.

Please continue to comply with our weekly testing requirement if you are working or living on campus; however, do NOT visit the testing site if you are experiencing symptoms, have a known exposure or have been directed to isolate/quarantine. The testing site will remain open during regular hours (8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.).

This decision was not taken lightly. While we hope this pause is very temporary, we must be flexible in how we approach the coming days to allow the CRRT to make the best decisions possible to prioritize health and safety at UIS.

A decision regarding Thursday’s approach to operations will be announced by late Wednesday afternoon. A Zoom briefing will take place at 4 p.m. tomorrow (Nov. 11) to share the most current information and to address campus questions; watch for Zoom information via email with login instructions. The CRRT will provide daily updates at the end of each day to keep the campus informed.

I cannot stress enough how important it is that we continue to consistently wear masks, keep our distance from others, avoid unnecessary gatherings and practice good hand hygiene.

United in Safety,

Karen M. Whitney, Ph.D.
Interim Chancellor
University of Illinois Springfield

Please send questions to covid19@uis.edu.


Wednesday, November 04, 2020

UIS announces Spring 2021 schedule update due to COVID-19


The following update to the University of Illinois Springfield Spring Semester 2021 schedule, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, was emailed to the UIS community on Nov. 4, 2020.

UIS Community: 

On Friday, Chancellor Whitney approved recommendations for the Spring 2021 semester from the Campus Senate Executive Committee. These recommendations include: 
  • Conducting all classes remotely during the first two weeks of the semester (January 19-29). 
  • Adapting the five days of Spring Recess to distribute them across multiple weeks of the semester, resulting in the following five non-instructional days:
    • Tuesday, March 2 and Wednesday, March 3
    • Monday, April 26
    • Thursday, May 6 and Friday, May 7 (Reading Days) 
Non-instructional days are defined as days when no classes are held either in person or remotely, and no examinations or assignments of any kind (papers, projects, quizzes, etc.) are due. This includes the two Reading Days at the end of the semester, meaning that final projects, papers or exams cannot be due on Reading Days. 

These recommendations seek to prioritize the health and safety of the campus and surrounding communities to the greatest extent possible, by limiting opportunities for off-campus travel while providing non-instructional days that correspond with peak periods of student demands for counseling and stress release. 

Thank you to the many individuals who contributed to the extensive conversations surrounding the Spring 2021 semester. 

Dennis Dennis R. Papini 
Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost 
University of Illinois at Springfield

Thursday, October 29, 2020

Current and prospective UIS students can continue to work toward goals over the holidays with accelerated courses

University of Illinois Springfield will offer 19 accelerated online and blended courses over the holiday break for prospective and current students. Most classes will begin Monday, Dec. 14, and will conclude mid-January.

"We know this is not going to be a traditional holiday season, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Many students are going to have extra time over the break and this is a great chance to continue their education and potentially earn a degree in a shorter period of time,” said UIS Interim Chancellor Karen Whitney.

Due to the accelerated nature of the classes, it is recommended that students only enroll in one course.

Accelerated courses will be offered in accountancy, biology, computer science, criminal justice and criminology, environmental studies, management information systems, political science, psychology, public administration, sociology and anthropology and teacher education.

The 2020 presidential election, policing in America and website design are among a few of the topics that will be covered in the accelerated classes. A full list of courses is available at uis.edu/winter.

The deadline to apply for the accelerated courses is Friday, Dec. 11. Prospective students can apply for admission at uis.edu/apply. Current UIS students can sign up using the instructions found at uis.edu/registration/courseschedule/accelerated/. All courses are eligible for financial assistance.

For more information, prospective students are encouraged to contact the UIS Office of Admission at 217-206-4847 or admissions@uis.edu. Current UIS students should direct questions to the Office of Record and Registration at 217-206-6174 or registrar@uis.edu.

Thursday, October 22, 2020

UIS raises $5 million as Reaching Stellar cruises toward fundraising campaign goal




The University of Illinois Springfield Reaching Stellar fundraising campaign made great strides during the past fiscal year. 

UIS secured approximately $5 million in gifts during fiscal year 2020, which ran from July 1, 2019, through June 30, 2020. The successful year of fundraising means the University cumulatively has raised $36.82 million – or 91.89 percent – of the $40 million Reaching Stellar campaign goal as of Sept. 30. The campaign has two more years until it closes. 

“The Reaching Stellar campaign ultimately will help UIS further develop several areas of expertise and service, but foremost is the intent to improve access for students to acquire a University of Illinois education,” said UIS Interim Chancellor Karen Whitney. “To this effect, UIS has been extremely fortunate to have affirmation from a wide-ranging group of supporters: Alumni, community friends, corporations and foundations, students and staff.” 

Reaching Stellar: The Campaign for the University of Illinois Springfield, aims to raise $40 million to benefit students, faculty and the central Illinois community. The initiative – which publicly launched Oct. 10, 2017, and is the largest fundraising campaign in UIS history – will continue through 2022. 

Gifts to Reaching Stellar support the campaign’s five priorities: 
  • Scholarships: Affirming the aspirations, energy and diversity of our students 
  • Academic Excellence: Learning that empowers the future 
  • UIS Center for Lincoln Studies: To instruct, inspire and elevate us all 
  • “The Public Good”: Engagement. Collaboration. Impact. 
  • Facilities and Technology: Building tomorrow’s University today 
Jeff Lorber, vice chancellor for advancement at UIS, said there are some significant, visible examples of what the generosity demonstrated throughout the Reaching Stellar campaign has helped accomplish on campus. 

“Our donors have helped us realize some of our big dreams and ideas in a relatively short period of time. The building of the Student Union was brought forth in part by private giving of all levels from hundreds of individuals and organizations,” said Lorber, who also serves as senior vice president for the University of Illinois Foundation. “Sangamon Experience, the interactive exhibition space that opened earlier this year at UIS and celebrates the history and impact of the local region, was initiated through a single multi-million-dollar gift.” 

Reaching Stellar is part of a comprehensive fundraising initiative of the three universities of the University of Illinois System, located in Urbana, Chicago and Springfield. The collective goal for the systemwide effort is $3.1 billion: To date, financial commitments totaling more than $2.83 billion, or 91.14 percent, have been made toward that systemwide goal. 

“Despite the disruptions caused by the global pandemic, University of Illinois Springfield donors did not waiver and in fact, they continued to invest generously in UIS,” said Jim Moore, president and CEO of the University of Illinois Foundation. “In a year when UIS is celebrating its first 50 years, the UIS Reaching Stellar Campaign is helping to ensure the next 50 years and beyond will be even more impactful.” 

To learn more about the Reaching Stellar campaign, visit uis.edu/reachingstellar/ or contact the UIS Office of Advancement at advancement@uis.edu or 217-206-6058.

Thursday, October 15, 2020

Federal government features UIS in video series on how to better prepare child welfare workers nationwide

A video series shot at the University of Illinois Springfield’s Child Protection Training Academy is serving as a national simulation training model for preparing child welfare workers and students for working with at-risk children and families. 

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Center for States, part of the Child Welfare Capacity Building Collaborative and a service of the Children’s Bureau, filmed the Academy’s simulation scenarios and conducted interviews at the UIS residential simulation lab and mock courtroom before the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in March. 

The videos and other resources on the new “Keeping it Real” website will be used by child welfare agencies throughout the United States to prepare child welfare workers and students for difficult interactions with families, as they investigate cases of suspected child abuse. The Center for States hopes the videos will help agencies learn about the benefits, costs and considerations for implementing similar training programs in their states. 

“Over the years several state child welfare professionals have visited campus to better understand how simulation training improves transfer of learning and critical decision-making in the field,” said Betsy Goulet, principal investigator of the of the UIS Child Protection Training Academy. “The new ‘Keeping it Real’ website consolidates the research, tools and videos other programs across the country need to begin to replicate the model for their workforce.” 

The videos cover an investigator’s first knock on the door of a family’s home, an interview with medical personnel on how to discuss physical evidence in a case, a presentation of findings in family court, an overview of simulation training and a debrief from those who participated in simulation training. All of the videos can be found on the Center for States' website

Since its founding in 2016, the UIS Child Protection Training Academy in Springfield, in partnership with the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS), has provided simulation training for nearly 800 new child protection investigators. The UIS training module was expanded to Chicago in partnership with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and to Carbondale this spring in partnership with Southern Illinois University. 

“The Department of Children and Families Services’ implementation and expanded use of simulated learning is a major step forward in recognizing that knowledge-based training alone is not enough” said Illinois DCFS Acting Director Marc D. Smith. “The model designed by UIS has played a key role in the professional development of our staff and this video series is a great resource for other agencies across the country looking to improve the overall quality of investigations and better serve the most vulnerable.”

Tuesday, September 22, 2020

UIS to offer accelerated eight-week courses for prospective and current students starting Oct. 19


 

The University of Illinois Springfield will offer 27 new accelerated eight-week courses for prospective and current students. Most will begin Monday, Oct. 19 and end on Saturday, Dec. 5. Others, like athletic training, will start on Nov. 2 and end on Jan. 15, 2021. 

“We know this has been a challenging year for many people,” said UIS Interim Chancellor Karen Whitney. “Many students may not have been ready to start classes in August due to the COVID-19 pandemic but are ready to start now. This is also a great opportunity for current students to add to their course load and potentially earn their degree in a shorter period of time.” 

Accelerated courses will be offered in accountancy, athletic training, business, communication, educational leadership, human development counseling, management, mathematical sciences, philosophy, teacher education and theatre. A full list of courses is available at uis.edu/accelerated

Prospective students should apply by the end of the day on Friday, Oct. 16 at uis.edu/apply. Current UIS students can sign up by Oct. 25 using the instructions found at uis.edu/registration/courseschedule/accelerated/. All courses are eligible for financial assistance. 

For more information, prospective students are encouraged to contact the UIS Office of Admission at 217-206-4847 or admissions@uis.edu. Current UIS students should direct questions to the Office of Record and Registration at 217-206-6174 or registrar@uis.edu.

Monday, September 14, 2020

UIS ranked the top public regional university in Illinois by U.S. News & World Report

The University of Illinois Springfield has been ranked the top public regional university in Illinois and the fourth best public university in the Midwest regional category for a second year in a row by U.S. News & World Report in 2021 Best Colleges rankings released today.

UIS was also ranked fifth best by U.S. News & World Report when it comes to students graduating with the least amount of debt in the Midwest regional category.

“Even though our students and alumni tell us we are No. 1, these rankings confirm the high quality education students receive at UIS,” said UIS Interim Chancellor Karen Whitney. “This prestigious ranking shows our prospective and current students, our alumni and friends that the UIS college experience is outstanding. Our inspiring faculty and hard-working staff working with each and every student is the UIS difference.”

According to U.S. News & World Report, some of the factors it looked at in determining UIS’ overall ranking include retention and graduation rates, faculty resources (such as class size and faculty salary), academic reputation, financial resources available to students, how well students performed academically in high school (including ACT/SAT and high school percentile rank) and alumni giving.

UIS also appeared on U.S. News and World Report’s “A-plus Schools for B Students” list for the Midwest regional category, due to UIS’ overall performance in the rankings and average freshman retention rate.

“We here at UIS are thrilled with the news that we have retained the No. 1 spot for public regional university in Illinois,” said Natalie Herring, UIS associate provost for enrollment management. “What this means for our right-sized community, is that we are doing a good job challenging high-achieving students and supporting future stars of great potential.”

Since 2006, UIS has been ranked consistently among the top 15 best public regional universities in the Midwest by U.S. News & World Report. The full report and additional data can be found at usnews.com/best-colleges.

UIS is one of three universities in the world-class University of Illinois System and provides students with a high-quality liberal arts education, exceptional public affairs opportunities and outstanding professional preparation programs.

For more information on the UIS rankings, contact Derek Schnapp, director of public relations, at 217-206-6716 or dschn3@uis.edu.

Wednesday, September 09, 2020

University of Illinois Springfield sees positive trends, despite slight decrease in overall enrollment

After the first 10 days of classes, University of Illinois Springfield Fall 2020 census numbers show the total number of students enrolled in classes stands at 4,146 compared to 4,275 students in Fall 2019 (a 3 percent decrease from last year). However, the total number of credit hours taken by students remains steady at 43,130 (down only 1.2 percent from last fall).

UIS reported a 6 percent increase in the number of students taking classes online amid the COVID-19 pandemic. The total number of students taking classes online is 1,540, compared to 1,451 students last fall. This number doesn’t reflect the number of students taking hybrid and remote classes. UIS online students reside in nine foreign countries and one territory (Guam), 46 states and 82 Illinois counties.

“With the concern of COVID-19 and some students talking about taking a gap year, these numbers are better than we had expected,” said Interim Chancellor Karen Whitney. “The bottom line is that we are and will continue to be a place that provides a uniquely student-centered educational experience both in and out of the physical classroom. We are national leaders in online learning, and we have once again proven this year that we can expertly provide classes in a remote learning format. In fact, we’re teaching other schools how to more effectively teach online.”

Total undergraduate enrollment stands at 2,654 students compared to 2,674 in fall 2019. The number of graduate students decreased from 1,601 in 2019 to 1,492 in 2020. Overall, the UIS student body has a higher percentage of Illinois residents this semester. A total of 3,243 students are Illinois residents, making up 78.2 percent of the student body, compared to 76.6 percent of the population in fall 2019.

UIS continues to be a diverse campus, seeing a more than 6 percent increase this semester in the number of students who self-identify as Hispanic (371 compared to 348 last fall). Hispanic students make up nearly 9 percent of the student body. The total number of African American students enrolled this semester stands at 535, comprising nearly 13 percent of the student body. Asian students make up more than 4 percent of the student body (183 students). International students account for more than 6 percent (255) of students enrolled, down from 373 students in fall 2019.

UIS is one of three universities in the world-class University of Illinois System and provides students with a high-quality liberal arts education, exceptional public affairs opportunities and outstanding professional preparation programs.

For more information, contact Derek Schnapp, UIS director of public relations, at 217-206-6716 or dschn3@uis.edu.

UIS releases certified list of summer and fall 2019, spring 2020 graduates

More than 970 students earned degrees from the University of Illinois Springfield during Summer Semester 2019, Fall Semester of 2019 and Spring Semester 2020.

Commencement ceremonies were cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Below you'll find a printable list of graduates' names and degrees listed by the city of residence on file with UIS Records and Registration at the time of graduation.

Please note that those who were eligible to participate in a previous year’s commencement and eventually earned their degree in Summer 2019, Fall 2019 or Spring 2020 are not included.

Graduates Names (Excel) | Graduates Names (PDF)

Wednesday, September 02, 2020

UIS celebrates 50th anniversary by reflecting on a bold legacy and looking forward to a bright future

The University of Illinois Springfield (UIS) is celebrating its 50th anniversary during academic year 2020-21, as the public liberal arts university reflects on a bold legacy and looks forward to a bright future as an educational leader in central Illinois and beyond.

Billboards featuring UIS’ 50th anniversary logo and tagline “Bold Legacy. Bright Future.” are now up in Springfield. UIS also plans to celebrate the anniversary on its social media channels.

Reflecting on the anniversary, UIS Interim Chancellor Karen Whitney notes how UIS began as an upstart campus in a temporary building and is now ranked as the No. 1 public regional university in Illinois by U.S. News & World Report.

“UIS’ star is bright!” Whitney said. “Our unconventional start, our culture of thinking outside the box, our stamina and grit – these qualities continue to propel us forward, no matter the situation or the challenge. Hard work, determination and collaboration advances our mission to provide a uniquely student-centered educational experience both in and out of the classroom.”

Bold Legacy 

In 1960, a group of central Illinois citizens, united in their goal of bringing a four-year university to the capital city, formed the Springfield Committee for Higher Education. Theirs was not the first attempt to bring such an institution to Springfield, but it was successful. On June 10, 1969, Gov. Richard Ogilvie signed legislation creating Sangamon State University (SSU), which would later become UIS.

SSU was a child of its time. Conceived as an “upper-level” three-year institution, a “capstone” to the state’s community college system, SSU offered junior, senior and graduate courses.

On Sept. 28, 1970, 45 charter faculty members began teaching 811 students in temporary classrooms at Springfield’s First United Methodist Church. The first classes on UIS’ present day campus were not held until Oct. 5, 1970, due to construction delays.

Karen Hasara, who was the second person in line to register for classes and later would become a state senator and Springfield mayor, would say later many times that the establishment of SSU/UIS was the greatest thing to happen to Springfield in the last quarter of the 20th century.

“The community was very excited about having a university,” said Hasara, who was also the first UIS alumna on the University of Illinois Board of Trustees. “I always say that I think it was one of the best things that happened to Springfield. It brought in a lot of people who weren’t from here, and we needed that.”

For nearly 25 years, Sangamon State University thrived, awarding its first degrees in 1971, as campus grew with the addition of Brookens Library, the Public Affairs Center (housing Sangamon Auditorium) and on-campus housing. In 1991, SSU enrolled 4,192 students, breaking the 4,000 mark for the first time.

However, changes were ahead as the state decided to reorganize higher education in Illinois. On Feb. 28, 1995, Gov. Jim Edgar signed into law legislation that made Sangamon State University the third campus of the University of Illinois. Thus was born the University of Illinois Springfield on July 1, 1995.

UIS would continue to grow in the 1990s enrolling even more students and would become a nationwide leader in online learning.

On Aug. 22, 2001, a group of about 120 freshman students would change the campus forever. The newly approved Capital Scholars Honors Program brought high-achieving first-year students to campus for the first time. In 2005, the University of Illinois Board of Trustees approved a new general education curriculum, making UIS a full-fledged four-year university.

“Both going with the University of Illinois and gaining four-year status meant a different future for this institution,” said UIS Chancellor Emeritus Naomi Lynn, who led SSU and UIS from 1991 to 2001. “It changed its future, determined what was going to happen. It put us in a different category.”

UIS saw a large physical growth on campus in the 2000s with the addition of Lincoln and Founders residence halls, University Hall, the Colonnade and The Recreation and Athletic Center.

“Newcomers to Springfield just take it for granted that there’s a four-year institution out here on the south side of town,” said UIS Chancellor Emeritus Richard Ringeisen when he retired in 2010 after leading the university for nine years. “I’m absolutely confident that UIS has a great future.”

UIS continued to grow in the 2010s, becoming a full-fledged member of NCAA Division II athletics in 2010 and enrolling a record 5,431 students in fall 2014. Academic programs also been expanded with the addition of programs in information systems security, data analytics, theater, exercise science, and a new bachelor of science in nursing through a partnership with University of Illinois at Chicago and Memorial Health System. In 2018, UIS also cut the ribbon on a new $21.75-million Student Union that serves as the campus’ living room.

“The Student Union was important for many reasons, but fundamentally it was important because the university experience is really about relationships,” said UIS Chancellor Emeritus Susan Koch, who led from 2011 to 2020. “It’s about building community. It’s about togetherness. It’s about meeting people and having conversations. The Student Union has been all of that and more.”

50th Anniversary Events 

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, UIS has delayed planning in-person activities to celebrate the anniversary but plans to mark the anniversary on campus when it is safe to have larger gatherings.

The UIS Office of Advancement will host a virtual Lunch & Learn Series as part of the 50th Anniversary celebration. The first of six events is planned for Thursday, Oct. 8. Visit go.uis.edu/LunchFall20 for details.

For more on UIS’ history and future planned events celebrating the 50th anniversary, visit 50.uis.edu.

Monday, August 24, 2020

University of Illinois Springfield announces 18 new faculty appointments

The University of Illinois Springfield has announced 18 new faculty appointments. Four faculty members will teach in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, six in the College of Business and Management, four in the College of Education and Human Services and four in the College of Public Affairs and Administration.

Hypatia “Tia” Bolivar, psychology instructor in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, holds a doctorate in psychology/behavior analysis from the University of Florida. Her research interests include behavioral analysis and relapse. Outside of work, she enjoys hiking/exploring, cooking, reading and her puppy.

Salem Boumediene, associate professor of accounting, economics and finance in the College of Business and Management, earned a doctorate in business administration-accounting from the University of Tunis. His research interests include bringing accounting and decision making research to practice. His personal interests include traveling and discovering new places.

Michael Chuang, assistant professor of management information systems in the College of Business and Management, holds a doctorate in business administration from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research interests include technology use for business, online learning, innovation and entrepreneurship. Outside of work, he enjoys hiking, jogging, arts and cooking.

Tessica “Tess” Dooley, assistant professor of legal studies in the College of Public Affairs and Administration, earned her law degree at the University of Arkansas. Her research and professional interests include the evolving landscape of employee benefits law due to executive action, race and access to health care. Her personal interests include spending time with her 4-year old son, hiking, gardening and red wine.

Sahar Farshadkhah, assistant professor of management information systems (MIS) in the College of Business and Management, is expected to earn a doctorate in business administration and computer information systems from Louisiana Tech University this year. Her research and professional interests include MIS – cybersecurity. Outside of work, she enjoys Pilates, TRX and cooking.

Matthew Geras, assistant professor of political science in the College of Public Affairs and Administration, is expected to earn a doctorate in political science from the University of Oklahoma this year. His research and professional interests include American politics-elections, political parties, congress and representation. His personal interests include reading, running, hiking and sports.

Cathy Gunn, visiting professor of teacher education in the College of Education and Human Services, earned her doctorate in curriculum and instruction from the University of Oregon. Her research and professional interests include professional development, online learning, program assessment and strategic planning. Outside of work, she enjoys antiquing, visiting her grandchildren and traveling.

Timothy Hakenewerth, assistant professor of human development counseling in the College of Education and Human Services, is expected to earn a doctorate in counselor education and counseling from Idaho State University this year. His research and professional interests include counselor education and counseling, including the impact of previous work experience on counselor development and on clinical supervision. He’s also interested in leadership and professional networking. Outside of work, he enjoys cooking, hosting friends for gatherings (and food), woodwork and watching St. Louis Cardinals baseball.

Amy Hewitt, assistant professor of teacher education in the College of Education and Human Services, is expected to earn a doctorate in educational studies/mathematics education from the University of North Carolina – Greensboro this year. Her research and professional interests include elementary mathematics, whole-class discussions and selecting student work. Her personal interests include running, her dogs, cleaning and being outside.

Xiang Huang, assistant professor of computer science in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, is expected to earn a doctorate in computer science from Iowa State University this year. His research and professional interests include theoretical computer science, algorithmic information theory and analog computing. Outside of work, he enjoys traveling, playing badminton, hiking and biking.

Jose Irizarry, a doctoral dissertation fellow in public administration in the College of Public Affairs and Administration, is expected to earn a doctorate in public administration from Florida Atlantic University this year. His research and professional interests include public service and administration, nonprofits, human resources, organization studies, public policy, community engagement and diverse and inclusive pedagogy. His personal interests include time with family, cooking, helping others and exploring new places.

Adam Larison, instructor of music in the Department of Art, Music, & Theatre in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, earned a doctorate in musical arts with a focus on guitar performance and literature from The Eastman School of Music. His research and professional interests include classical music history, history of hip hop and new music improvisation. Outside of work, he enjoys reading, playing with his dog, baseball and football.

Daniel Platt, assistant professor of legal studies in the College of Public Affairs and Administration, earned a doctorate in American studies from Brown University. His research and professional interests include legal history and political economy. His personal interests include bicycling, chess and home maintenance.

Trung Pham, assistant professor of accounting, economics and finance in the College of Business and Management, is expected to earn a doctorate in accounting from Kent State University this year. His research interests include the impact of governance on earnings management and earnings quality. Outside of work, he enjoys reading, fishing and spending time with his family.

Misty Sax, assistant professor of athletic training in the Department of Allied Health in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, earned her doctorate in athletic training from Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions. Her research and professional interests include clinical anatomy, concussion injuries in women's soccer and the impact of pandemic on student athletes. Her personal interest include making cards, reading and gardening.

Yuan Wen, assistant professor of management, marketing and operations, in the College of Business and Management, earned his doctorate in marketing from Washington State University. His research and professional interests include marketing-finance interface and marketing strategy. Outside of work, he enjoys traveling and playing racquetball.

Stephanie Maynard-Patrick, visiting assistant professor of management, marketing and operations in the College of Business and Management, earned her doctorate in business administration/management from New Mexico State University. Her research and professional interests include human resources and organizational behavior. Outside of work, she enjoys scrapbooking, reading and spending time with her kids.

Lisa Vinson, assistant professor of human services in the College of Education and Human Services, is expected to earn a doctorate in counselor education and supervision from Northern Illinois University this year. Her research and professional interests include America’s ethnicities, their dynamics and consequences of discrimination. Her personal interests include reading and watching historical documentaries.